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Cross-Cultural Creation Residency

A francophone artist

An anglophone Artist

An indigenous artist

The Association acadienne des artistes professionnel.le.s du Nouveau-Brunswick (AAAPNB), ArtsLink NB and Mawi’Art: Wabanaki Artist Collective, join forces again for the second Cross-cultural creation residency. A community residency between an Acadian artist, an anglophone artist, and an indigenous artist in New Brunswick. 

This year’s program is slightly altered due to the pandemic, and will comprise of a two week-long residency at the Saint John Arts Centre. Through this residency, artists will have the opportunity to create new work while immersing themselves in the artistic process of fellow artists. 

The experience of being in another community and creating with people of different artistic backgrounds allows one to go beyond language barriers and discover different cultural environments. Recognizing current debates surrounding cultural and language tensions in New Brunswick, this initiative demonstrates that it is possible to grow by combining strengths rather than advocating division. Art in itself is a means of expression and cohesion and makes it possible to break down the boundaries that all too often isolate us.

Meet the artists: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francine Francis is a Mi’kmaq visual artist from Metepenagiag First Nation, New Brunswick.  Influenced by the land, the wild animals and pride in her Mi’kmaq culture, she continues to integrate the double-curve, porcupine quill design motifs along with Mi’kmaq language, petroglyphs and hieroglyphs in her work. Her work is in permanent collections at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, The New Brunswick Art Bank, Fredericton, New Brunswick  Museum in Saint John, NB., The Province of Saskatchewan, Regina, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Amherst, Nova Scotia, The Toronto Dominion Bank in Fredericton, The Metepenagiag Heritage Park and the New Brunswick Community College in Miramichi.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan Smeby is a celluloid based filmmaker and visual artist from Newcastle, New Brunswick. Graduating from Concordia University in 2011 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, Smeby has most recently held residencies at Nyege Nyege in Kampala, Uganda and Juke Studios in Kuwait City, Kuwait completing several collaborative film projects.

Dan is thrilled to now take part in his first residency project in his home province alongside Francophone and Mi’kmaq artists as part of the Cross-cultural residency at the Saint John Arts Centre. During the residency he will bend the confines of the conventional, with a time based mixed media installation.

Smeby will develop by hand 16mm black and white film via organic processing techniques, planning to adhere the physical film to plexiglass. Smart LED lights will be mounted to the other side of the plexiglass offering a plethora of adjustable color schemes, programmed to sync with a local sound composition.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Champagne is a photographer who lives and works in Maisonnette (NB), Canada. Working mostly in the field of documentary photography, he is fascinated by the human being, his behaviors and his lifestyles. He uses photography in a sociological way, as testimony of a contemporary time. His work explores notions of territory and how man alters and modifies its immediate environment. He also works with photomontage, where he diverts and transforms photographs from his documentaries, to deliver images with surreal, humourous and whistleblower content.

Over the years he has collaborated with several magazines and newspapers, and also NGOs, as many locals as internationals. In 2013, he published “L’ostie de printemps”, the first self-published photographic essay on the social crisis that marked Quebec’s province in spring 2012. In 2015, he obtained a grant from the Quebec Arts Council and the TV5 Fund, with which it has co-directed the documentary web series Seasonal Life. In 2018, he received his first grant from the New Brunswick Arts Board as well as from the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture.


 

 

OBJECTIVES OF THE RESIDENCE

  • To encourage the artistic exploration and the production of new works by providing space and time
  • To contribute to increasing the artistic quality of the work
  • To favour the collaboration and the sharing of expertise and experiences
  • To create significant cultural bridges of different cultural communities in the province.
  • To provoke encounters between artists and the public and to help raise awareness of the creative process.

The work in progress must be presented publicly at the end of each week. The artists will have complete freedom of creation, but will be called upon to open their creation space to allow the community to discover their work through open-studio visits. 

THE SELECTED ARTISTS UNDERTAKE TO :

  1. Provide their own working materials
  2. Interacting with the participating artists 
  3. Present publicly the work in progress at the end of each week in the form of an exchange with the public.
  4. Submit a final report to the AAAPNB, ArtsLink and Mawi’Art 30 days after the end of the residency. 

This project is a collaboration between ArtsLink NB, the Association acadienne des artistes professionnel.le.s du Nouveau-Brunswick and Mawi’Art: Wabanaki Artist Collective and is made possible thanks to the support of the government of New Brunswick.


Cross-Cultural Creation Residency

The Acadian Association of Professional Artists of New Brunswick (AAAPNB), ArtsLink and Mawi’art are teaming up to create a cross-cultural residency between an Acadian artist, an Anglophone artist, and an Indigenous artist. Through this residency, artists will have the opportunity to create new work while immersing themselves in the artistic process of fellow artists. The experience of being in another community and creating with people of different artistic backgrounds allows one to go beyond language barriers and discover different cultural environments. Recognizing current debates surrounding cultural and language tensions in New Brunswick, this initiative demonstrates that it is possible to grow by combining strengths rather than advocating division. Art in itself is a means of expression and cohesion and makes it possible to break down the boundaries that all too often isolate us.

This program is supported by:

The Government of New Brunswick, ArtsLink NB, Association Acadienne des Artistes Professionnel.le.s du Nouveau-Brunswick, Sheila Hugh MacKay Foundation, Mawi’art: Wabanaki Artist Collective, the Saint John Arts Centre and the Metepenagiag Heritage Park.